Bibliography

Search:
Browse by Author:
[ A | B | C | D | E | F | G | H | I | J | K | L | M | N ]
[ O | P | Q | R | S | T | U | V | W | X | Y | Z | All ]
Browse by Category:

 

Dorman, Shawn, ed. Inside A U.S. Embassy: How the Foreign Service Works For America. Washington, D.C.: American Foreign Service Association, 2005.

This work is among the most informative books on the inner workings of U.S. embassies around the globe and is a must read for anyone considering a career in the Foreign Service. It takes readers inside embassies and consulates in more than 50 countries, providing detailed descriptions of Foreign Service jobs and first-hand accounts of diplomacy in action. The volume contains profiles of the different positions in a typical embassy, “a day in the life” journals and case histories of exceptional events as experienced by embassy personnel.

top

Ferguson, Niall. Colossus: The Price of America's Empire. New York: Penguin Press, 2004.

This provocative work examines America's historical hesitation to be classified as an empire and argues that, despite its discomfort with the term, the United States is nothing less than the most powerful empire the world has ever seen. Arguing that America should not shy away from the responsibilities associated with such a role, the author asserts that many parts of the world would benefit from an extended period of American rule. However, he questions whether the United States is up to such a task, citing its three deficits: - its economic deficit, its manpower deficit and, most serious of all, its attention deficit. As such an "empire in denial" in constant search for quick fixes, the United States may find that, like Rome, its regrettable imperial decline is most likely to come from within rather than from any powerful challenger.

top

Freeman, Chas. Arts of Power: Statecraft and Diplomacy. Washington, D.C.: US Institute of Peace, 1997.

This unique volume undertakes the task of creating a tool for diplomatic practitioners to utilize when applying “the fundamental principles of the arts of power.” Drawing on his own extensive Foreign Service career, Freeman provides a clear outline and introduction to diplomatic thought and practice. Among numerous other subjects, the book addresses the role of intelligence, political action, cultural influence, economic measures and military power, as well as diplomatic strategy and tactics, negotiation, and the tasks and skills of diplomacy. This book is both a thought-provoking manual for the professional diplomat and a guidebook for the student of diplomacy.

top

Gaddis, John Louis. The Cold War: A New History. Minneapolis, MN: HighBridge Co. 2005

Through this succinct, masterful analysis of the central issues of the Cold War, Gaddis summarizes the major and many minor events that affected the Cold War from World War II through the fall of the Soviet Union, with special concentration on why the West ultimately won and how this victory helped shape the world of today. The work also serves to remind the reader how easily the East-West conflict could have ended up differently, incinerating much of humanity – and how important it is that the thin line between diplomacy and military assertiveness be navigated carefully.

top

Huntington, Samuel. The Clash of Civilizations and the Remaking of World Order. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1996

This exceptional volume examines a new phase in world politics in which the cause of both divisions among humankind and international conflict will be cultural. Huntington contends that cultural differences in religion, tradition, history and language are deep and increasing in relevance in regards to future conflicts. Thus the United States must ally itself with similar cultures and attempt to spread its values. At the same time, Huntington argues that while the United States should attempt to accommodate alien cultures, it must also be willing to be confrontational when required. Overall, he expresses the need for cultural toleration and its importance in a peaceful world.

top

Huntington, Samuel et. al. The Clash of Civilization?: The Debate. New York: Foreign Affairs, 1996.

This book offers a collection of readings by influential thinkers of our time on contemporary international relations. Starting with Huntington’s original Clash of Civilizations essay, this publication offers a variety of responses from a wide range of academics from historical, political, cultural and economic perspectives. This thought-provoking compilation takes a hard look at the impact that cultural difference has on the international order.

top

Ikenberry, John, ed. American Foreign Policy: Theoretical Essays (5th ed.). New York: HarperCollins College Publishers, 2004

This exceptional collection of thought provoking essays includes selections written by leading scholars of U.S. foreign policy and international relations. Ikenberry provides an excellent representation of today’s major perspectives and theories on U.S. foreign policy by delving into a wide range of topics that include the international sources of foreign policy, the relationship between class, capitalism and foreign policy, the effects national values and democratic institutions have on foreign policy, as well as many more theoretical debates. This book is a tremendous source for any reader interested in cultivating a better understanding of U.S. foreign policy.

top

Keeley, Robert. First Line of Defense: Ambassadors, Embassies and American Interests. Washington, DC: American Academy of Diplomacy, 2000.

This work, compiling wisdom from approximately 30 ambassadors, offers a real-world picture of how diplomacy is practiced today. It usefully depicts the roles played by ambassadors, the challenges they face, the influence they may or may not have on the substance of U.S. foreign policy and their broader responsibilities in promoting U.S. interests overseas. Although written before 2001, Keeley's poignant appeal for greater funding and expanded personnel resources for the Foreign Service rings true even more vividly in the post-9/11 world of U.S. diplomacy.

top

Kennan, George. Memoirs 1925-1950. New York: Random House, Inc. 1983.

Awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 1957, this beautifully written, introspective book by one of the most influential diplomats of his era brings to life major events of U.S. diplomatic history before, during and after World War II. Kennan's deep understanding of Russian history and culture serves as the basis for authoritative comments on America's troubled relations with that country over the turbulent quarter century covered in his narrative and provides contextual background for his famous "long cable" that served as the basis for the U.S. containment policy toward the Soviet Union adopted by President Harry S. Truman.

top

Kissinger, Henry. Diplomacy. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1994.

This brilliant work of history, analysis and memoir by the most influential foreign policy player during the Nixon presidency presents a readable yet scholarly insider's perspective on critical developments during the Cold War. In addition to describing his own first-hand diplomatic encounters, Kissinger offers insightful commentaries on such subjects as the broad East-West balance of power structure in the postwar period, the complexities of negotiating an end to America's involvement in Vietnam and how national negotiating styles can influence the outcomes of policy.

top

Kohut, Andrew and Bruce Stokes. America and the World: How We Are Different and Why We Are Disliked. New York: Times Books: 2006.

This important contemporary work draws on polling data from some 50 countries throughout the world to examine the fundamental sources of present-day anti-Americanism. It explores, for example, the ways that America’s sense of exceptionalism, religiosity, individualism and optimism set it apart from other countries, including those of Western Europe – with which it shares many other common values and outlooks – and thus impede its ability to build consensus and otherwise exercise effective leadership in a world that feels threatened by America-led forces of globalization.

top

Kopp, Harry W. Commercial Diplomacy and the National Interest. New York, NY: American Academy of Diplomacy; Business Council for International Understanding, 2004

This lively work describes the importance of promoting U.S. business abroad in maintaining America’s place in the world.  As the world’s leading exporter, importer and source and destination of funds for foreign investment, the United States, the authors argue, must vigorously protect and expand its role as the world’s supplier and customer of choice for goods, services, ideas, capital and entrepreneurial energy.  Case histories that deal with market access, investor rights, protection of intellectual property, corrupt practices, contract sanctity, sanctions, security and other trade and investment issues show how diplomacy works with business to achieve commercial objectives that advance national interests.

top

Linderman, Patricia and Brayer Hess, Melissa ed. Realities of Foreign Service Life. San Jose, CA: Writers Club Press, 2002.

This invaluable resource gives an honest and balanced view of the realities of life as a Foreign Service Officer.  Providing reflections and perspectives on the realities experienced by members of the Foreign Service community, this compilation of essays offers first-hand accounts on a wide variety of topics important to those considering or already established in a Foreign Service career, such as maintaining long-distance relationships, raising children abroad, dealing with depression, coping with evacuations and readjusting to life in the United States.  These are stories of true experiences from those who have lived the lifestyle and want to share their hard-learned lessons with others.

top

Mahbubani, Kishore. Beyond the Age of Innocence: Rebuilding Trust between America and the World. Hong Kong: Perseus Book Group, 2005.

This thought-provoking work provides an excellent window into how other countries view the United States. While stressing the many ways that the United States has benefited the world and probably always will, Mahbubani is primarily concerned with explaining to Americans why the U.S. image is rapidly deteriorating. He contends that after the Cold War, America made a serious mistake by ignoring the plight of poor countries and by seeming to be indifferent to the consequences of its decisions. Concerned about the severe consequences to America and to the rest of the world if the current gap between the United States and the global community is not narrowed, he suggests ways that America can change its ways while there is still time.

top

Mandelbaum, Michael. The Case for Goliath: How America Acts As the World's Government in the Twenty-First Century. New York: Public Affairs, 2005

Mandlebaum argues that the United States, rather than leading an “empire,” has become an essentially benign “Goliath” that is “the functional equivalent of the world’s government.” He describes the many benefits the international community receives from U.S. leadership, particularly its role of providing the security and economic frameworks within which peace, democracy and free markets have a chance to flourish for the benefit of all. Stressing that there is currently no alternative leader or collectivity capable of replacing it, he concludes: “About other countries’ approach to the role of America’s role as the world’s government,..three things can be safely predicted. They will not pay for it; they will criticize it; and they will miss it when it is gone.”

top

Mead, Walter Russell. Special Providence: American Foreign Policy and How It Changed the World. New York,: Alfred A. Knopf,, 2001.

In this impressive history, Mead offers a challenging thesis for how the United States managed to enjoy more than two centuries of extraordinary success in foreign affairs and become the richest and most powerful country in the world. He argues that, at its best, America’s foreign policy effectively balances four competing impulses: a "Hamiltonian" concern with commercial strength; a "Wilsonian" desire to disseminate U.S. values; a "Jeffersonian" focus on nurturing democracy at home; and a “Jacksonian” commitment to populist values and military strength. Mead calls for the U.S. to recognize these various roots of its past accomplishments and use this knowledge to fashion policies of “strategic elegance” to address current problems.

top

Naim, Moises. Illicit: How Smugglers, Traffickers and Copycats are Hijacking the Global Economy. New York: Doubleday, 2005.

This hard-hitting book explores how illicit activities, from arms trafficking to music bootlegging, have exploded worldwide as a result of globalization. While smuggling and money laundering have always existed, Naim shows how they have increased at a staggering pace in the wake of globalization, the collapse of the Iron Curtain, and state deregulation. Naim also delves into the criminal networks that profit from these illegal activities, creating a picture of illicit trade that demonstrates that these activities are not contained within the criminal underworld, but are inextricably linked to legitimate commerce and, as a result, directly affect the entire world.

top

Nicolson, Harold. Diplomacy. New York: Harcourt Brace, 1939

This classic work explores the origins of diplomacy, its development over the centuries, basic diplomatic practices and the personal qualities required of successful diplomats. Written in 1939, Nicholson not only provides insight into the traditions governing diplomatic relations to this day but also offers instructive guidance to new and aspiring diplomats.

top

Nye, Joseph. Soft Power: The Means to Success in World Politics. New York: Public Affairs, 2004.

This persuasive book makes a strong case for U.S. public diplomacy aboard. Nye argues that, as a supplement to its “hard power” assets of its military and economic strength, U.S. interests are often well served by the “soft power” that attracts nations and peoples to U.S. values and culture. The book provides a careful elaboration of the concept behind “soft power,” highlights its benefits and candidly discusses its limitations.

top

Steil, Benn and Robert E. Litan. Financial Statecraft: The Role of Financial Markets in . New Haven, CN: Yale University Press, 2005

This work is the first devoted explicitly to what the authors have dubbed “financial statecraft,” the influencing of capital flows.  They point out that the international purchase and sale of financial assets has reached an estimated $2 billion per day, about 90% of which is unrelated to trade in goods and services – a stunning change from just a few decades ago.  The authors argue that, in trying to advance its foreign policy objectives through the instruments of financial statecraft, the United States has been ineffectual in some areas, harmful to its own interests in others and too disengaged to capitalize on opportunities in still others.

top